The double whammy

January 5th, 2018

Sometimes I can’t sleep – well actually, I may be dreaming that I can’t sleep. The other night I was convinced I was awake, but I had no clue about the earthquake that struck at 2:30am. But somehow, even dreaming I haven’t slept seems to make me tired.

So the double whammy is loosing sleep and getting the chronic fatigue.

 

When it hits

January 3rd, 2018

When it hits, it isn’t fatigue – it isn’t lack of sleep – it is either brain fog or a lack of desire to do anything. The brain fog means I can’t remember simple things. Last night I was trying to say I got essential oils for Christmas. It came out as “not incense, an aroma”. It took me 10 minutes to come up with essential oils in my mind – of course the person I had been talking to was long gone.

And the other symptom is the hard one to talk about – most people confuse it with depression when I try to describe it. But it isn’t that – the best I can come up with is that depression has an emotional context and this symptom does not. I can see however why people confuse it and why researchers might put the blame on the person and not the symptom.

I might act like I care about you or the task at hand – but I don’t. I simply balance an equation in my mind as to whether I care about you or it when I’m not sick. And if I do, then I’ll force myself to take action. And if I can’t force myself to take action, I don’t leave the house.

Exercise (specifically Yoga) and Chronic Fatigue

January 1st, 2018

Two common misbeliefs about chronic fatigue are that

  1. It is mental/emotional
  2. Exercise can cure it.

See Bad Science Has Misled Millions With Chronic Fatigue, Court Order Reveals and For People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, More Exercise Isn’t Better.

For me, my adventure began shortly after I started losing weight via walking/running and yoga. I’ve always wondered if that lifestyle change triggered the disorder in me, but I wouldn’t trade the yoga away for the disorder. I don’t have it as bad as most (I think) and my worst days sound like good days to some of the stories I read at https://themighty.com.

But, what yoga does bring me is a barometer to my health. I generally like my yoga instructors and some of them I love, so when I start asking myself why I am in a class, what I am getting out of it, and how long until it is over, I know I am near my worst. My worst? I won’t even go to a class – despite whatever grand scheme I have in place for attendance.

Some random links

January 1st, 2018
  • Molecular profile hints at inflammatory processes in chronic fatigue
  • Vitamin D Supplements Could Help People With Sleep Disorders, Study Says
  • People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Are Exhausted at a Cellular Level, Study Shows
  • NIH Study Aims To Unravel The Illness Known As ‘Chronic Fatigue Syndrome’
  • Bad Science Has Misled Millions With Chronic Fatigue, Court Order Reveals
  • A Controversial Therapy For ME Has Led To Claims Of Death Threats, Harassment, And Pseudoscience
  • For People With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, More Exercise Isn’t Better
  • The Spoon Theory written by Christine Miserandino
  • The Spoon Theory Gave People the Wrong Idea About My Illness
  • Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis at The Mighty
  • Finding out about Chronic Fatigue

    January 1st, 2018

    The stories all seem to be the same, your friend gets the flu. You get the flu. Your friend gets better, you get better. Then you get sick again and can’t kick it. You think it might be depression, but you still can’t shake it.

    Eventually, you go to the doctor and you find out you have chronic fatigue. And then you have to figure out what that means…

    Some event in your life triggered it, it may have been the flu, it may have been stress, or as I fear, it may have been weight loss and exercise. 🙂

    (In my case, my friend got sick again and so did I. Only he eventually got over it.)

    Update: Compiling XDR for NFSv4 on Linux

    April 26th, 2014

    For modern Fedora systems:

    sudo yum install -y nfs-utils libtirpc-devel

    seems to do the trick!

    Getting static addresses in a Linux client under NAT and VMware Fusion

    April 23rd, 2014

    I had a client working fine enough with DHCP, but I really want to be able to
    consistently ssh into it.

    I looked at:

    /Library/Preferences/VMware Fusion/vmnet8/dhcpd.conf
    

    and determined that I did not have to modify it to get a static address:

    allow unknown-clients;
    default-lease-time 1800;                # default is 30 minutes
    max-lease-time 7200;                    # default is 2 hours
    
    subnet 172.16.249.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
            range 172.16.249.128 172.16.249.254;
            option broadcast-address 172.16.249.255;
            option domain-name-servers 172.16.249.2;
            option domain-name localdomain;
            default-lease-time 1800;                # default is 30 minutes
            max-lease-time 7200;                    # default is 2 hours
            option netbios-name-servers 172.16.249.2;
            option routers 172.16.249.2;
    }
    host vmnet8 {
            hardware ethernet 00:50:56:C0:00:08;
            fixed-address 172.16.249.1;
            option domain-name-servers 0.0.0.0;
            option domain-name "";
            option routers 0.0.0.0;
    }
    

    I.e., I could use addresses 172.16.249.2 -> 172.16.249.127 for static assignment. (There is a bug in that statement, which is why I am writing this down.)

    I always skip the first 20 addresses, so I assigned:

    KinSlayer:flexfiles loghyr$ more /private/etc/hosts
    ##
    # Host Database
    #
    # localhost is used to configure the loopback interface
    # when the system is booting.  Do not change this entry.
    ##
    127.0.0.1       localhost
    255.255.255.255 broadcasthost
    ::1             localhost 
    fe80::1%lo0     localhost
    172.16.249.1    kinslayer
    172.16.249.21   skull
    172.16.249.22   kitty
    

    skull to be 172.16.249.21.

    I modified skull’s /etc/sysconfig/network:

    [root@skull linux]# more /etc/sysconfig/network
    # Created by anaconda
    HOSTNAME=skull
    

    and /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eno16777736

    [root@skull linux]# more /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eno16777736
    TYPE="Ethernet"
    BOOTPROTO="static"
    DEFROUTE="yes"
    IPV4_FAILURE_FATAL="no"
    IPV6INIT="yes"
    IPV6_AUTOCONF="yes"
    IPV6_DEFROUTE="yes"
    IPV6_PEERDNS="yes"
    IPV6_PEERROUTES="yes"
    IPV6_FAILURE_FATAL="no"
    NAME="eno16777736"
    UUID="3e93f225-d48a-4de0-919a-5ef5d1f428e7"
    ONBOOT="yes"
    HWADDR="00:0C:29:98:83:E7"
    PEERDNS="yes"
    PEERROUTES="yes"
    DEVICE=eno16777736
    NM_CONTROLLED=no
    IPADDR=172.16.249.21
    NETMASK=255.255.255.0
    GATEWAY=172.16.249.1
    DNS1=172.16.249.1
    

    Disabled Network Mangler and turned on network:

    service NetworkManager stop
    chkconfig NetworkManager off
    yum erase NetworkManager
    service network start
    chkconfig network on
    

    I tested that I could ssh into and out of skull to my laptop. Fine, job done.

    Only DNS wasn’t working the next day:

    [root@skull linux]# more /etc/resolv.conf
    # Generated by NetworkManager
    domain localdomain
    search localdomain
    nameserver 172.16.249.1
    

    I checked online, and found I should be using 172.16.249.2. Fine, job done.

    Well then I couldn’t get to github.com port 22 to get a project update.

    Push comes to shove, I should have not assumed that 172.16.249.1 is special
    with this NAT. It is not the laptop as far as a DNS server and gateway is concerned.

    So I changed this line in /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eno16777736:

    GATEWAY=172.16.249.2
    

    And restarted the network – now my DNS change was gone (why does service network restart add in the line about “# Generated by NetworkManager” to /etc/resolv.conf ??).

    Fine, fixed this line as well:

    DNS1=172.16.249.2
    

    And restarted.

    Now it all works, I think. 🙂

    Getting mail clients to work with domains at Gmail

    April 21st, 2014

    My work email is Thomas.Haynes@example.org and is actually maintained at gmail.com.

    Both Mail.app and mutt have had a hard time configuring for it.

    For Mail.app:

    1. Set it up as normal for a Google IMAP account.
    2. Then go to Mail -> Preferences, select the account.
    3. Then on the “Outgoing Mail Server (SMTP):”, select by left click the server
    4. and then “Edit SMTP Server List …”.
    5. Now, select the server again
    6. First you’ll want to change the “Description” to be “Example.org” (this is in the “Account Information”)
    7. Second you will want to select Advanced
    8. Third, change the “User Name:” from “First.Last@gmail.com” to be “First.Last@example.org”

    It should work now

    For mutt, I followed the directions at Consolify your Gmail with MUTT with the exception of the following line:

    set smtp_url = "smtp://yourusername@smtp.gmail.com:587/"
    

    I modified it to be:

    set smtp_url = "smtp://First.Last@example.org@smtp.gmail.com:587/"
    

     

    Installing xml2rfc on OSX

    April 21st, 2014
    curl -O https://raw.github.com/pypa/pip/master/contrib/get-pip.py
    python get-pip.py
    pip install xml2rfc
    

    yields:

    clang: error: unknown argument: '-mno-fused-madd' [-Wunused-command-line-argument-hard-error-in-future]
    
    clang: note: this will be a hard error (cannot be downgraded to a warning) in the future
    
    error: command 'cc' failed with exit status 1
    

    So try:

    curl -O https://raw.github.com/pypa/pip/master/contrib/get-pip.py
    python get-pip.py
    export CFLAGS=-Qunused-arguments
    export CPPFLAGS=-Qunused-arguments
    pip install xml2rfc
    

    As partially documented here in Ansible Installation -clang: error: unknown argument: ‘-mno-fused-madd’.

    And the crowd goes wild!

    April 17th, 2014

    RFC 7204